Registered Dietitian Careers: Top Skills and Qualities of Successful RDs

Here at Dietitians on Demand, we get a lot of client feedback on our contractors’ performance. We love hearing a positive review, and often when a client is thrilled with one of our RDs there are a number of concrete and soft skills that are consistently expressed. We’ve complied a few of these skills to share.  When you’re out in the workplace it may be helpful to keep them in mind to ensure success in your role!

Adaptability

When you step into a new position, take some time to observe the work style of other RDs or your CNM.
Not every hospital or LTC facility operates in the same way, and assimilating to the culture of your new workplace can go a long way.

Quick ramp-up on electronic medical records systems

It’s sometimes tough to keep up with changing technology these days, but electronic medical records systems are here to stay and if you haven’t had the opportunity to work with them yet it’s crucial to find a way to get some training (even in your spare time). There are a vast number of EMR systems out there but if you can learn one you’re far more likely to catch on to a new one quickly.  Hiring managers don’t have a lot of time to train RDs on these systems and they expect to see them used correctly in a short period of time.

Desire to be a team-player

RDs in larger facilities have to work together.  You don’t have to be the group’s social butterfly but make sure you can be friendly and open with others on your team (and on other teams, such as the nursing staff).  Fluid communication is important in the fast-paced world of patient care, and if your team is comfortable with approaching you it’s much easier to get the job done.  Smaller facilities may allow you to run on your own most of the time, but for times you do have to interact with others, like care planning for example, this also applies!

Efficiency (without sacrificing quality)

You’ve probably been asked how many assessments you can do per day on multiple interviews.  We know this varies based on acuity of patients, charting systems, and many other factors.  But if you aren’t able to hit the minimum expectation and consistently fall short on your completed assessments, it’s time to find a way to work more efficiently to get these done.  The most important thing to remember here is to never sacrifice quality of your notes and your patient’s needs.  It’s a balancing act that will help you in your career if mastered.

Maybe you’ve received other feedback that you find to be very important that we didn’t address.
Feel free to share in the comments below!

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